BRETONBUCKS.COM
BEGINNINGS

Improbable though it sounds, my first encounter with the whitetail deer was under a bunch of spruce trees in the back seat of a Model T Ford, in what is now downtown Ottawa.
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.SHEDDING ANTLERS

My brother was just a kid, about 14 years old, but well-trained and experienced in the woods.  I suggested to him that if he pushed that buck, it might make him shed one or both of his antlers—the timing was right.  He thought it was a great idea, and jumped out of the car, saying, “pick me up here on your way back.”  MOREHERE...
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THE .44/40 WINCHESTER BEFORE THE BUCK LAW

My father shot his first deer at his uncle’s farm/woodlot, when he was thirteen years old.    He became a great woodsman and hunter, and did his best to pass on his knowledge and experience to us.  He was the teacher, the coach, and the Boss—a true patriarch, until his death in 1979.  He never said how many deer he shot in his life, probably because he never counted them.
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DAD AND THE DEER HOUNDS

In the 1950’s, Dad was a building contractor, and had lots of business contacts. About 1953, one of these gentlemen, knowing that Dad was a good hunter, invited him to participate in a week-long deer hunt. This was Dad’s first experience with a hunting club, and hunting with hounds. 
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GERRY’S TEN-PINNER

My brother Gerry was an unbelievably good shot.  From the time he was a six-year-old with a bee-bee gun,  he shot with both eyes open.  Dad would tell him to close one eye when aiming, and Gerry would say that he could see his shot perfectly with both eyes open.  Apparently the top competitive shooters do this.  When Gerry began hunting rabbits and deer, he continued to aim with both eyes open, and he absolutely never missed.  In 1964, when he was seventeen years old, he put down one of our biggest bucks:  231 ½ pounds!!
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EFFECTS OF THE ICE STORM


The Great Ice Storm of 1998 that hit Northeastern United States, Ontario and Quebec, caused significant change in whitetail habitat. Oak, butternut and beech trees ordinarily are a great source of high fat, high protein feed for deer.  These trees were severely damaged by the ice storm.  The largest trees were most vulnerable:  their extensive branches accumulated tremendous ice coatings, and simply snapped
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